Hall of Fame

Introduction

A vigorous democracy depends more on arguments that take place in the media and other public places than those debated in parliaments ... We should acknowledge those members of the media who did their best, and honour those whose best was superb.
– Professor Geoffrey Blainey

The media has played a vital part in shaping Australian history. It has helped rid us of corrupt officials and incompetent governments, it has fought for positive social change and brought comfort to citizens in times of disaster.

From the first editions of the Melbourne Advertiser, handwritten by John Pascoe Fawkner in 1838, to the work of contemporary journalism in print, the broadcast media and on new digital platforms, great journalism has built, enriched and defended our democracy.

The Media Hall of Fame, founded in 2011 by the Melbourne Press Club, comprises more than 80 reporters, editors, broadcasters, photographers, cartoonists and commentators. The journalism of these individuals has not only been outstanding but has also made a difference to society. Most were, or are, journalists of national renown. Some have had an international impact.

In highlighting the work of these media legends, the Media Hall of Fame seeks to show the historical importance of strong and independent journalism, and the importance of ensuring it continues.